Friday, August 1, 2008

Southern Hoe Cake aka Biscuit Bread

Biscuit bread aka Hoe cake is pantry friendly bread with a crispy topping and a moist center, just like a big old biscuit.  
Have you ever had a hoe cake? It's really just a big biscuit and it's one of my family's favorite breads. The outside is nice and crispy and the inside is cotton soft like a biscuit. For the longes time I couldn't make a homemade biscuit if my life depended on it, but I could make a hoe cake (go figure). 

If I need bread in a hurry and don't have any on hand this biscuit bread is usually what I make. I always have all the ingredients in my pantry and it's pretty quick to throw together. You can alternate the fat (shortening or butter) called for in the recipe depending on what you have on hand. This biscuit bread is also delicious served for breakfast for biscuits and gravy, with jam or served along side any country breakfast.  

Preheat oven to 425. Pour a thin layer of oil to cover the bottom of an eight inch round cake pan and place in oven to heat so the pan gets nice and hot. 
 
In a large bowl add the flour and cut in the butter or shortening until is resembles tiny pieces of blended butter.  

Add the buttermilk or milk and mix using a spatula. 

Remove the pan from the oven and pour the batter into the pan. 

Bake for 15-20 or until browned. Invert onto plate, slice and serve.


Yield: 6
Author: Tina Butler | Mommy's Kitchen
Southern Hoe Cake aka Biscuit Bread

Southern Hoe Cake aka Biscuit Bread

Biscuit bread aka Hoe cake is pantry friendly bread with a crispy topping and a moist center, just like a big old biscuit.
Prep time: 10 MinCook time: 25 MinTotal time: 35 Min

Ingredients

  • 2 cups self rising flour (do not substitute)
  • 1 1/2 cups buttermilk or use 1 1/2 cups regular milk + 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup vegetable shortening or butter, softened

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425. Pour a thin layer of oil to cover the bottom of an eight inch round cake pan or iron small iron skillet. Place the pan in the oven and get it nice and hot.
  2. In a large bowl add the flour and cut in the butter or shortening until is resembles tiny pieces. Add the buttermilk or milk and mix using a spatula.
  3. Remove the pan from the oven and pour the batter into the pan. Bake for 15-20 or until browned. Invert hoe cake onto serving plate and serve.
  4. Slice in serving size pieces.

Notes:

Make your own Self Rising Flour:

If you don't have self rising flour on hand you can make your own. To make 2 cups of self-rising flour, you would mix together 2 cups of all-purpose flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, and ½ teaspoon salt. 

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11 comments:

Yvonne, Houston,TX said... #

I've been making this for some time now. I have to make two at a time. You're right it's like a big biscuit. I bake mine in an iron skillet and it comes out perfect every time! Love this recipe. It's great with crock pot meals and especially sausage & gravy over the top! :)

Unknown said... #

I made this tonight with hamburger helper. There was none left in the pan. Next time I'll make two at once. I didn't have to change the recipe at all. This was Excellent!!!

Anonymous said... #

We use to make this but no lard and fry them and i think we used water instead of milk gonna try this though

Tina Butler said... #

This recipe doesn't use lard. It uses vegetable shortening.

Verna Hebert said... #

What is the difference of vegetable shortening compared to lard ? Is the shortening oil ?

Tina Butler said... #

There is not lard in this recipe so I am unsure where the previous poster got that information from. This recipe uses shortening which is vegetable fat (not vegetable oil). Shortening goes by the name of Crisco and it is in the baking isle. Lard is a pork fat.

Anonymous said... #

Would one need to add a little water if using buttermilk instead of regular milk?

Unknown said... #

This has been passed down through the generations of my family and I still make it for the grandkids or my daughter when she asks. The only difference is we use oil instead of shortening and we make it on top of the stove. Yes and the big secret is being able to flip it. lol lol (this is why my daughter asks me to make it) It is a time tested resolve that is for sure to say the least. I think I will try your way next time. lol lol

Unknown said... #

MY MOTHER USE TO MAKE THIS JUST ABOUT EVERYDAY AND WE LOVED IT BUT I NEVER LEARNED TO MAKE IT AS DID ANY OF MY SIBBLINGS ALL I KNEW WAS SHE USED FLOUR BUTTERMILK AND CRISCO AND SHE FIXED IT IN THE OVEN IN A PAN THAT WAS WELL SEASONED OVER THE YEARS AND THATS JUST ABOUT ALL SHE USED THIS PAN FOR WAS MAKEING HER BREAD DURING THE WEEK THEY ATE ALOT OF BROWN BEANS WITH ONIONS AND THIS BREAD WILL HAVE TO TRY MY HAND AT IT AND SEE IF I CAN DUPLICATE HER DELISIOUS BREAD

Unknown said... #

My mom used to make this and every I talk to says it's making cornbread in an iron skillet. My mom mixed everything together (wish I knew the ingredients) but I knew it was flour, buttermilk, and milk. Rolled it out to fit in our pizza pan, covered it with butter and we had pizza cut bread that would melt in your mouth. She passed a year and a half ago and I want to try. Any advice would be helpful. Thank you in advance.

www.eclecticgirldesigns.com said... #

My mother, who was from NC, used to make this all the time when I was growing up. She made it in an iron skillet on top of the stove and we ate it with butter and honey (the best!). Sometimes she would put cracklings (fried pieces of hog fat) in it and she called it "cracklin bread." She is now gone and I can't ask her for her recipes so I started researching hoe cake and cracklin bread online. All the recipes I found used cornmeal until now. Yours is the closest to her recipe I have seen. Thank you!