Monday, October 28, 2019

How to Home Can Pears (Pears in Light Syrup)

Pears can be preserved at their peak by packing the fruit in a light syrup to help them retain their texture and flavor.   

Do you know how to can pears? Canning pears are the perfect way to preserve pears at their peak to enjoy year round. Especially if you find yourself with an abundance of pears. Today I am going to show you an easy step-by-step tutorial on how to can pears in a light syrup. 

The first thing to remember when canning pears is to use firm pears and not pears that are soft or over ripe. You can use the ripe pears to snack on, make pearsauce or to make this wonderful Pear Honey


Last year our pear tree only produced 3 pears and that was it! We were so disappointed and also unaware that having a partner tree greatly increases the chances of pollination, so last fall we planed a second pear tree next to our original tree for better results. 

When the end of summer rolled around our pear tree was filled with pears from top to bottom. I was so excited and could hardly wait for all the fruit to mature for picking. I had so many recipes swirling in my mind. 

Every year I make Pear Preserves, but this year I tried my hand at canning pears in a light syrup and they turned out delicious. I was so amazed at how close they tasted to store bought canned pears, but without all the additives and preservatives. This recipe calls for sugar and water to make a simple syrup and pears. That's it, so let's get to the recipe.  

Start by gathering all of your pears together and then wash them under cold water.    

Cut off the top and bottom and peel and core the pears. I use my apple peeler and corer to peel my pears (moving the corer - slicer blade down so the pear stays whole when peeled). I have to say it made the whole process easier by using an apple peeler. 

Once the pears are peeled, cored and diced, add the pears to a large bowl of cold water that has been acidified with lemon juice or Fruit Fresh this keeps the pears from turning brown. 

Now it's time to make the syrup. In a large saucepan or pot, combine the sugar (I use Raw Sugar) and water. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Reduce heat to medium-low to keep warm.
  

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pears from their citric acid solution and pack into hot jars.  Ladle the hot syrup into each jar to cover the pears (make sure to leave 1/2 inch head space). Remove any air bubbles. Wipe the rims, center the lids on the jars and screw on a ring to each jar (finger tip tight). 

Place the jars in a prepared water bath canner and make sure they are completely covered with water. Bring the water to a boil and process the jars. Pints for 20 minutes and quarts for 25. 

Remove jars from canner and place on the counter that has been lined with a dish cloth to cool the jars. After a few hours, check the jars to make sure they sealed by gently pressing down in the middle of each lid. If the lid has no give it's sealed. If you can press the lid and it pops back up, your jar is not sealed and will need to be reprocessed.




Home Canned Pears in Light Syrup 

Ingredients:
8 - 12 - pounds ripe but firm pears 
5  1/4 - cups water
2  1/4 - cups raw sugar 
lemon juice or Fruit Fresh  
8 - pint size or 4 quart size canning jars, lids, rings
wide mouth funnel 
canning tongs and jar lifter
chop stick or straw to remove air bubbles

Instructions:
Prepare the jars: Clean and wash jars with soapy water. Prepare the water bath canner by filling it with water. Place the jars into the water (on a canning rack or large cloth so the jars do not come in contact with the bottom of the pot). You need to have enough water to cover the jars by about 2 inches. 

Bring the water to a boil then reduce the heat to a low. You want to keep the jars warm until you are ready to fill them with pears. 

In a separate pot cover the lids and rings with water and bring the water to a slow boil turn off the heat, remove from the burner and leave the rings and lids in the pot. 

Prepare the pears: Cut off the top and bottom of the pears. Peel and core the pears.  I use my apple peeler and corer to peel my pears (moving the corer - slicer blade down so the pear stays whole when peeled). Here is an example.

Once the pears are peeled, cored and diced, add the pears to a large bowl of cold water that has been acidified with lemon juice or Fruit Fresh this keeps the pears from turning brown. 

How to make the syrup: In a large pot or  saucepan, combine sugar and water. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Reduce heat to medium-low. 

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pears from their citric acid solution and pack into hot jars.  Ladle the hot syrup into each jar to cover the pears (make sure to leave 1/2 inch head space). Remove any air bubbles. 

Using a clean rag, wipe the rims of the jars to make sure it is free of any fruit or syrup, center the lids on the jars and screw on a ring to each jar (finger tip tight). 

Place jars on the canner rack. Bring the water to a boil and lower the jars into the water making sure the jars are covered with water by at least 2 inches. 

Process pints for 20 minutes and quarts for 25. Remove jars from canner and place on the counter that has been lined with a dish cloth. Cool the jars. 

After a few hours, check the jars to make sure each jars has sealed by gently pressing down in the middle of each lid. If the lid has no give it's sealed. If you can press the lid and it pops back up, your jar is not sealed and will need to be reprocessed. 

Store cooled jars in a cool dry place for up to 1 year. 

Recipe yields: 8 pint jars or 4 quart size 
source: Balls Complete Book of Home Preserving 








3 comments:

Colleen said... #

Thank You. Hubby loves pears and he just mentioned the other day for me to can some up. Of course we have no pear trees so guess that is something to think about planting.
You know; when using my apple peeler, I never even thought about moving the slicing blade down. Thanks for the tip and of course the recipe on canning pears.

Colleen said... #

Do have a ?
Is that a Bartlett pear trees that you planted?

Tina Butler said... #

We have a Bartlett and a Keifer Pear Tree. Using the apple peeler saves so much time.